Local ski hill with big heart

John Roark / jroark@postregister.com New skiers head down Skier’s Lane at Kelly Canyon Ski Resort on Jan. 20. “Kelly is a great place to learn because we have great beginner terrain,” said Roger Anderson, who runs Kelly’s ski school. “These kids eventually go away but when they have kids they come back that’s kind of the cycle,” Anderson said. John Roark / jroark@postregister.com

Kelly Canyon Ski Resort is that kind of hill.

At-home workouts offer cheap option to gym

In this Aug. 16, 2017 photo, Nicole Winhoffer, front right, teaches her NWMethod fitness class at The Standard Hotel in New York. Loved by Madonna and Kate Hudson, Winhoffer mixes dance cardio and strength training. Her workout NW Church gives you access to the hour-long class Winhoffer teaches in New York every Sunday so you're sweating right alongside Nicole. (Gabriel Eugene/Nicole Winhoffer via AP)

Between bomb cyclones and deep freezes, it’s hard to find the motivation to leave your toasty home for a sweat session. Or maybe you’re just too cash-strapped after the holidays to fork over $25 for your usual barre classes.

Handmade? How to know amid mass production

Rings made of recycled wood and other found materials along with resin for under $30 each are shown at Bhoomki, a Brooklyn store specializing in "ethically-fashioned" and hand-crafted clothing and jewelry, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, in New York. Craftspeople in some of the poorest places on earth are making unexpected inroads into the U.S. retail market, expanding their clientele beyond museum shops and craft markets. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

NEW YORK — Guatemalan women skilled in traditional Mayan beadwork technique have made chic pillows and pouches for West Elm. Hand-dyers in India, using petals collected from discarded Hindu temple floral offerings, help craft scarves for Eileen Fisher and Anthropologie. Baskets hand-woven in Rwanda are part of the home decor collection at Macy’s. Craftspeople in some of the poorest places on Earth are making unexpected inroads into the U.S. retail market, expanding their clientele beyond museum shops and craft markets. A trend that started decades ago with the rise of fair trade-minded entrepreneurs has accelerated as growing international tourism creates demand for cultural products. Exports of artistic crafts from developing countries surged from $9 billion in 2002 to $23 billion in 2011, according to the most recent UNESCO report on the global creative economy. The digital age has given rise to a growing number of ventures designed to create online markets for global crafts. More recently, exotic craftwork has piqued the interest of major fashion and home decor retailers striving to compete in the age of Amazon. Many are betting craftsmanship rooted in ancient traditions, combined with stories of social impact on artisan communities, will lure shoppers increasingly concerned about where and how products are made.

Don’t want to bother with cat litter? Try a robot

In this Jan. 11, 2018, photo, a guest plays with Sony Corp.'s new Aibo robot dog at its showroom in Tokyo. The Japanese maker of the PlayStation video game consoles pulled the plug on Aibo 12 years ago, drawing an outcry from global fans. The improved Aibo has more natural looking eyes, thanks to advanced OLED, or organic light-emitting diodes. It can cock its head and sway its hips at more varied, subtle angles. The relatively affordable home robot targets the elderly, kids and hard-working salarymen pressed for time. Unlike real children or pets, they have off switches and don’t need constant attention, dog food or cat litter. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

TOKYO (AP) — Japan, home of the “kawaii” cult of cute, has always had a soft spot for companion robots, in contrast to the more industrial or mechanical types used for assembly lines, surgeries and military missions. The Associated Press spent some time recently with three relatively affordable home robots from Japanese makers that target the elderly, kids and hard-working salarymen pressed for time. Unlike real children or pets, they have off switches and don’t need constant attention, dog food or cat litter.

Will the culture of Coconut Grove survive?

In this Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018 photo, David Villano stands at the entrance to his home, an oasis hidden behind native plants and towering trees, in the Coconut Grove neighborhood of Miami. The Grove is at risk of losing its unique history and tropical culture as new architecture goes up in single family neighborhoods. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

MIAMI (AP) — With its artsy vibe, lush landscapes and free-roaming peacocks, Coconut Grove has long been known as a bohemian paradise.

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