Wreckage of WWII ship found, offering closure

This Feb. 14, 1942 photo provided by the U.S. National Archives shows the five Sullivan brothers on board USS Juneau (CL-52) at the time of her commissioning ceremonies at the New York Navy Yard. The brothers who were all killed in the World War II sinking of the USS Juneau on Nov. 13, 1942. From left to right: Joseph, Francis, Albert, Madison and George Sullivan. Wreckage from the USS Juneau, a Navy ship sunk by the Japanese 76 years ago, has been found in the South Pacific. (U.S. National Archives via AP)

JUNEAU, Alaska — The recent discovery of the USS Juneau in the depths of the South Pacific has provided some closure to people with connections to the ship, which was blown apart during World War II. Hundreds died, including the five Sullivan brothers from Waterloo, Iowa, whose story was chronicled in a 1944 movie.

Ax throwing gains in popularity as pastime, sport

In this March 3, 2018, photo, an "axepert," center, gives contestants instruction on hatchet throwing techniques and the rules of the game at the Kick Axe Throwing venue in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Kick Axe Throwing is the first bar in New York City to pick up on a nationwide trend of ax throwing. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

NEW YORK — Leave it to the hipsters of Brooklyn to combine craft beer and sharp objects.

Fed up with Facebook? Here’s what to do

This screenshot taken Wednesday, March 21, 2018, in New York, shows a recently deleted Facebook profile page. Before deleting your account, rescue your posts and photos. Facebook lets you download the data you’ve shared with Facebook since you joined. If you’re not quite ready to delete Facebook, deactivating your Facebook is an option. (Facebook via AP)

NEW YORK — Fed up with Facebook? You’re not alone. A growing number of people are deleting it, or at least wrestling with whether they should, in light of its latest privacy debacle — allegations that a Trump-linked data-mining firm stole information on tens of millions of users to influence elections.

Creatures of the night on display at Audubon Zoo

In this Tuesday, March 20, 2018 photo, a Vampire Bat drinks bovine blood in the Criaturas de la Noche (Creatures of the Night) Bat House, the Audubon Zoo's new night house in New Orleans. The various species are all from Central and South America, and the building's interior simulates an abandoned warehouse set up to protect Mayan artifacts during a dig. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — It’s daylight outside, but with indoor lights simulating a full moon, hundreds of bats flap back and forth. On a nearby wall, what appears to be a talking stone face provides bat fun facts.

Time of the year for flower festivals approaches

FILE - In this April 16, 2014, file photo, tulips planted in a field near Mount Vernon, Wash. glisten with rain drops. The area is host to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

We’re coming up on cherry blossom festivals, tulip time and lilac season. Here’s a look at some of the places that celebrate spring flowers with festivals and other events.

War veterans use ancient epics to cope

In this Feb. 12, 2018 photo, University of Vermont student veterans Thomas Moore, left, and Dan Wright, participate in a class studying Homer's "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" in Burlington, Vt. The Greek poet wrote in detail familiar to modern soldiers about the discipline of war and the difficulties many service members face when they return home. Homer-for-veterans is the brainchild of Dartmouth College classics professor Roberta Stewart, who is now hoping for a grant that will allow her to expand the idea nationwide. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — The trials of Odysseus are really not that different from the struggles of those learning to readjust after wars of today, modern veterans are finding.

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