Pols seek to sway Puerto Rico arrivals before vote

In this April 14, 2018 photo, a voter registration booth stands during an event to help Puerto Rico hurricane victims in Elizabeth, New Jersey. The intensity of political attention ahead of midterm election is new for Puerto Ricans, who are accustomed to not having much political clout. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

MIAMI (AP) — A small street festival outside Miami features booths adorned with Puerto Rican flags. A band plays salsa music as vendors offer specialties from the Caribbean island such as rice with pork and chickpeas. There’s also a woman working her way through the crowd with a clipboard, her white T-shirt emblazoned with the words “Your vote, your voice, your future.”

In Trump era, the death of the W.H. press conference

FILE- In this May 10, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump talks to reporters during a meeting with Dr. Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under President Richard Nixon, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. The presidential news conference, a time-honored tradition going back generations, appears to be no longer. Instead, the president engages the press in more informal settings that aides say offer reporters far more access, more often, than past administrations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential news conference, a time-honored tradition going back generations, appears to be no longer.

Stuck in jail: Poor Mississippi inmates wait long for trial

In this Wednesday, April 11, 2018, image made from a videoconference, Jerry Sanders speaks from the Rankin County jail in Brandon, Miss., where he's been held on low-level drug possession charges since his arrest on March 14, 2017. Sanders is among the 2,500 inmates across Mississippi who have been held in county jails more than 90 days awaiting trial, often because they can't afford to post bail or hire their own lawyer. (AP Photo)

BRANDON, Miss. (AP) — Jerry Sanders has been sitting in a jail cell on a relatively minor charge of methamphetamine possession for more than a year — longer than the sentence he could get if he’s convicted.

New lynching memorial evokes terror of victims

Part of a statue depicting chained people is on display at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings, Sunday, April 22, 2018, in Montgomery, Ala. The national memorial aims to teach about America's past in hope of promoting understanding and healing. It's scheduled to open on Thursday. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Visitors to the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice first glimpse them, eerily, in the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed with the names of more than 4,000 souls who lost their lives in lynchings between 1877 and 1950.

In N. Myanmar, forgotten Kachin conflict intensifies

In this March 20, 2018 photo, a Kachin Independence army rebel stands at frontline outpost facing no man's land in Lawa Yang, outside of Laiza, the armed group's headquarters in northern Kachin state, Myanmar. While the world is focused on attacks on Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims, a civil war rages, pitting government forces against another of the country’s minorities, the Kachins, mostly Christian. It’s one of the longest-running wars on Earth, and it has intensified dramatically in recent months, with at least 10,000 people been displaced since January alone, according to the United Nations. (AP Photo/Esther Htusan)

LAIZA, Myanmar (AP) — On the front lines, the army is pounding rebels with airstrikes and artillery. In the displacement camps, terrified civilians are building bomb shelters of sandbags and stones. And everywhere in this troubled swath of Myanmar’s north, there is a growing sense the conflict will only get worse.

Times a changin’? Why America is ripe for protest in 2018

In this March 24, 2018 photo, Jan Rose Kasmir holds a sign with a photo of her offering a flower to soldiers in a 1967 protest against the Vietnam War, during a rally for gun safety laws in Bluffton, S.C. Kasmir gave up protesting when public opposition failed to stop the Iraq War in 2003. But after the 2017 Women's March, she returned to the lines this spring to rally for gun control near her home in Hilton Head, South Carolina, joining a series of recent protests by millions of Americans demanding change. "I think we've reached a tipping point," Kasmir said. (Courtesy Jan Rose Kasmir via AP)

She was the face of mass protest, but long ago lost her faith in protesting.

Travel ban case is justices’ first dive into Trump policy

FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in the morning in Washington. The Supreme Court has so far had little to say about Donald Trump’s time as president. That’s about to change. The justices’ first deep dive into a Trump administration policy comes in a dispute over the administration’s ban on travel from some countries with majority Muslim populations. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has so far had little to say about Donald Trump’s time as president, even as the nation has moved from one Trump controversy to another. That’s about to change.

Saudi women spend big on makeup, even if it’s just a glimpse

In this Thursday, April 19, 2018 photo, Najla Sultan bin Awwad works at Sephora in Riyadh. The mother of two in her 30s started working for the first time a year ago at the store, says even women who cover their face with a veil are becoming bolder in public, wearing colored contact lenses, eyelashes and drawing their eyeliner they way they want.(AP Photo/Aya Batrawy)

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — Green lipstick, blue lipstick and 40 shades of foundation to choose from are just some of the reasons why 18-year-old Shahad al-Qahtani is excited about superstar Rihanna’s makeup line debut in Saudi Arabia.

EPA head showed penchant for travel, drivers before DC

FILE - In this June 13, 2013 file photo, then-Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt gestures as he answers a question during a news conference in Oklahoma City. Newly obtained records show Pruitt’s penchant for travel and concerns about security was notable even before he became head of the Environmental Protection Agency. The records show that as Oklahoma’s attorney general, Pruitt frequently traveled out-of-state for appearances before conservative groups and used an office investigator as a driver. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Scott Pruitt’s penchant for travel and concerns about security were notable even before he became head of the Environmental Protection Agency, according to newly obtained records that show that as Oklahoma’s attorney general he frequently traveled out-of-state for appearances before conservative groups and used an office investigator as a driver.

Moon faces tough challenges ahead of summit with Kim

FILE - In this March 5, 2018, file photo, provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, front right, shakes hands with South Korean National Security Director Chung Eui-yong after Chung gave Kim the letter from South Korean President Moon Jae-in, in Pyongyang, North Korea. The upcoming meeting between the leaders of the rival Koreas will be the ultimate test of Moon’s belief that his nation should lead international efforts to deal with North Korea. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified. Korean language watermark on image as provided by source reads: "KCNA" which is the abbreviation for Korean Central News Agency. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP, File)

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The meeting next week between the leaders of the rival Koreas will be the ultimate test of South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s belief that his nation should lead international efforts to deal with North Korea.

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