Truth under Trump: Americans in a quandary

In this Jan. 10, 2018, photo, Victoria Steel, 50 of Cheyenne, Wyo. talks about President Trump and the media. Americans say they are increasingly confused and concerned about who can be trusted to tell them the truth about what’s happening in Washington these days. Interviews and research from President Donald Trump’s first year in office suggest Americans are scanning outlets for information about their government and their president. Steel says it's important for people to invest the time needed to find the truth about issues in the news rather than relying on sound bites and tweets. (AP Photo/Bob Moen)

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When truck driver Chris Gromek wants to know what’s really going on in Washington, he scans the internet and satellite radio. He no longer flips TV channels because networks such as Fox News and MSNBC deliver conflicting accounts tainted by politics, he says.

Alaska may open up again for oil leasing, but risks linger

FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2013, file photo, a U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter flies over the Kulluk, the Shell floating drilling barge off Kodiak Island in Alaska's Kiliuda Bay, as salvage teams conduct an in-depth assessment of its seaworthiness. Citing the disappointing results from an exploratory well in 2015, and challenging and unpredictable federal regulatory environment, Shell abandoned drilling in U.S. Arctic waters. The Trump administration is pursuing petroleum lease sales in Arctic waters but an analyst says potential bidders may find other areas more attractive. (James Brooks/Kodiak Daily Mirror via AP, File)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — President Donald Trump’s plan to open America’s oceans to petroleum drilling drew condemnation from West Coast and Florida governors but was welcomed in the state where most lease sales could be held.

States exploring tax changes in response to federal overhaul

FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018 file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo makes reference to his father Mario Cuomo as he delivers his state of the state address at the Empire State Plaza Convention Center in Albany, N.Y. During the speech, Cuomo pledged to sue over the new federal tax plan, which he called “an assault” by the federal government. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) — In New Jersey and California, top Democratic officials want to let people make charitable contributions to the state instead of paying certain taxes. In Connecticut and New York, officials are exploring a switch from income taxes to new ones on payroll. A few governors have even called for tax cuts.

Retail workers feel disruption from shifting shopper habits

ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, JAN. 8, 2018, AND THEREAFTER - In this Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017, photo, Laila Ummelaila, a personal shopper at the Walmart store in Old Bridge, N.J., pulls a cart with bins as she shops for online shoppers. Personal shoppers collect items on online orders and greet customers at a pickup location in the parking lot. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

This story is part of Future of Work, an Associated Press series that explores how workplaces across the U.S. and the world are being transformed by technology and global pressures. As more employers move, shrink or revamp their work sites, many employees are struggling to adapt. At the same time, workers with in-demand skills or knowledge are benefiting. Advanced training, education or know-how is becoming a required ticket to the 21st-century workplace.

AP Explains: Trump actions re-ignite states rights’ debate

FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 1, 2018 file photo, a customer purchases marijuana at the Harborside marijuana dispensary in Oakland, Calif., on the first day that recreational marijuana was sold legally in California. In January 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded a 2013 Obama Administration policy pledging that federal authorities would not crack down on marijuana operations in states where they were legal as long as the states maintained tight regulations. (AP Photo/Mathew Sumner)

Lawmakers and others in Democratic-leaning states have been howling over the past year about actions by the Trump administration and congressional Republicans that they say have undermined states’ rights. That includes promoting concealed carry legislation and attacking sanctuary status for immigrants to this week’s decisions on legalized marijuana and offshore oil drilling.

On health care, Democrats are shifting to offense

FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2017, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., attends a House and Senate conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats say they’re shifting to offense on health care, emboldened by successes in defending the Affordable Care Act. They say their ultimate goal is a government guarantee of affordable coverage for all. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are shifting to offense on health care, emboldened by successes in defending the Affordable Care Act. They say their ultimate goal is a government guarantee of affordable coverage for all.

Bodies emerge from Guatemala’s war-era ‘model villages’

In this Nov. 30, 2017, an Ixil Mayan carries the remains of a civil war victim to a memorial for a mass burial in Santa Avelina, Guatemala. During the civil war, the army identified the Ixil indigenous region as the support base of a guerrilla group and made it a testing ground for the kind of "strategic hamlet" program used by the U.S. in Vietnam, forcing people to live in army-built and controlled villages coined "centers of development" where many were left to die from malnutrition and treatable illnesses. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)

SANTA AVELINA, Guatemala (AP) — It wasn’t only bullets and violence that killed thousands of indigenous people during Guatemala’s 1960-1996 civil war.

As West Coast fights homelessness, kindness is contentious

Young volunteers from Lion's Heart, a non-profit community service organization, prepare sack lunches for homeless people Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, in Dana Point, Calif. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Mohammed Aly does not see any reason why he shouldn’t try to ease the lives of Orange County’s homeless. But the authorities — and many of his neighbors — disagree.

Ruling but no resolution on which teen killers merit parole

ADVANCE FOR RELEASE SUNDAY, DEC. 31, 2017 AND THEREAFTER -FILE - In this Saturday, April 26, 2014 file photo, the sun shines through concertina wire on a fence at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, La. Nearly two years after the January 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that prison inmates who killed as teenagers are capable of change and may deserve eventual freedom, the question remains unresolved: Which ones should get a second chance? (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Nearly two years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that prison inmates who killed as teenagers are capable of change and may deserve eventual freedom, the question remains unresolved: Which ones should get a second chance?

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