W.H. seeks to expand immigrant family detention

FILE - In this July 31, 2014, file photo, a courtyard is seen at the Karnes County Residential Center in Karnes City, Texas. The immigration detention facility has been retooled to house adults with children who have been apprehended at the border. The Trump administration is calling for the expanded use of family detention for immigrant parents and children who are stopped along U.S.-Mexico border, a move descried by advocates as a cruel and ineffective attempt to deter families from coming to the United States. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — The Trump administration is calling for the expanded use of family detention for immigrant parents and children who are stopped along the U.S.-Mexico border, a move decried by advocates as a cruel and ineffective attempt to deter families from coming to the United States.

OPEC agrees to pump more oil, crude prices jump anyway

Minister of Energy of the United Arab Emirates, UAE, Suhail Mohamed Al Mazrouei attend a news conference after a meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, OPEC, at their headquarters in Vienna, Austria, Friday, June 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

VIENNA (AP) — The countries of the OPEC cartel agreed on Friday to pump 1 million barrels more crude oil per day, a move that should help contain the recent rise in global energy prices.

Justices adopt privacy rules to track cellphones

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. In a 5-4 decision Friday, The Supreme Court says police generally need a search warrant if they want to track criminal suspects' movements by collecting information about where they've used their cellphones. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Police generally need a warrant to look at records that reveal where cellphone users have been, the Supreme Court ruled Friday in a big victory for privacy interests in the digital age.

Racist tropes in Ramadan TV satires anger black Arabs

This June 22, 2018 photo, comedian Amy Ghanem wears a wig with braids on an Egyptian show called "Azmi We Ashgan," which aired on the privately owned Al-Nahar channel, is seen on a laptop. In an attempt to capitalize on what’s become a ratings bonanza for Arabic satellite channels during the Muslim holy month Ramadan, two comedies struck the wrong chord with audiences when their lead actors appeared in blackface. Criticism was swift on social media, but failed to trigger a wider discussion on racism in Arab media. (AP Photo)

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — In an attempt to capitalize on what’s become a ratings bonanza for Arabic satellite channels during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, two comedies struck the wrong chord with audiences when their lead actors appeared in blackface, a form of makeup that darkens the skin to represent a caricature of a black person.

Cohen’s photo with Arnold fuels Trump tape speculation

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, Tom Arnold attends the premiere of "Dead Ant" in Los Angeles. Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former attorney, retweeted a photo posing with Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — President Donald Trump’s former longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen retweeted a photo of himself with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a TV show to hunt down recordings of the president, fueling speculation Friday that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them.

Car dealers gear up for Saudi women to hit the roads

In this June 21, 2018 photo, Nour Obeid looks at cars at the Al-Jazirah Ford showroom in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. This Sunday, Saudi Arabia will lift the world's only ban on women driving and Obeid's husband is encouraging her to get her license and drive. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — Cradling her four-month-old daughter, Nour Obeid scans the car showroom and heads to the mid-sized SUVs.

Delta bans pit bulls as service dogs, sparks backlash

FILE - This Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016 file photo shows a Delta Air Lines jet at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta. The company says it’s no longer allowing passengers to fly with “pit bull type” dogs as service or support animals, a policy that’s being met with criticism by groups that train service dogs and the people who use them. The changes are scheduled to take effect July 10, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

ATLANTA (AP) — Delta Air Lines says it’s no longer allowing passengers to fly with “pit bull type” dogs as service or support animals, a policy that’s being met with criticism by groups that train service dogs and the people who use them.

Jailed filmmaker in Russia loses 44 pounds on hunger strike

FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 file photo, Oleg Sentsov gestures as the verdict is delivered, as he stands behind bars at a court in Rostov-on-Don, Russia. A state news agency is quoting a Russian human rights official as saying that jailed Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov is in satisfactory condition despite a month-long hunger strike, it was reported on Thursday, June 21, 2018. (AP Photo, file)

MOSCOW (AP) — A lawyer for a Ukrainian filmmaker who has been on hunger strike for more than a month in a Russian prison says his client has lost about 44 pounds and is severely weak.

Confusion swirls on border after Trump reversal

Beata Mariana de Jesus Mejia-Mejia, left, embraces her son Darwin Micheal Mejia as she speaks at a news conference following their reunion at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, Friday, June 22, 2018, in Linthicum, Md. The Justice Department agreed to release Mejia-Mejia's son after she sued the U.S. government in order to be reunited following their separation at the U.S. border. She has filed for political asylum in the U.S. following a trek from Guatemala. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

McALLEN, Texas (AP) — Immigration enforcement on the U.S.-Mexico border was plunged deeper into chaos over President Donald Trump’s reversal of a policy separating immigrant children from parents, causing uncertainty for both migrant families and the federal agencies in charge of prosecuting and detaining them.

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